Malaga, Viva Las Vegas

Malaga has multiple aspects to it in that it wasn’t just a tourist town for the old town, ruins, and history. It had a big beach, and lots of hotels along the beach that were modern. That is where I got my title from, I was staying in the Las Vegas Hotel.

Malaga Beach across the street from where I was staying
Malaga Beach across the street from where I was staying

Malaga lies on the Costa del Sol (Coast of the Sun) of the Mediterranean, with Africa a little more than 100 km south, and the Strait of Gibraltar just about 100 km to the west. It is currently a town of over half a million.

Malaga
Malaga

Malaga’s city center could be called an “open museum” with archeological remains and monuments dating back over 2,800 years. Here you will find the ruins from the Phoenician, Roman, Arabic and Christian eras.

Malaga
Malaga

A little tidbit, Malaga is also the birth place of Pablo Picasso, Solomon Ibn Gabirol, and Antonio Banderas.

As usual, I took the first day off. I swam 20 laps in the pool, and then headed over to the beach. There were few people there. I did get in, but it got deep quick, and the current and tide were pretty strong, so I didn’t stay in long.

Malaga Beach
Malaga Beach

The following day, I set out to explore the town. Walking in towards the old town, I came across another Bullring, so I ventured in. You were allowed to enter the stadium free of charge if you let them take your picture, so I did.

Plaza de La M
Plaza de Toros de La Malagueta

On my way out, the photo expert had cropped my picture nicely, as a matter of fact, too nice. I laughed, and bought it.

Torro! Viva Malaga
Toro! Viva Malaga

To get to the Castillo de Gibralfaro, you had quite a little hike up to the top of the hill.

Walkway up to Castillo de Gibralfaro
Walkway up to Castillo de Gibralfaro
Plaza below the walkway to Gibralfaro
Plaza below the walkway to Gibralfaro

This is a good picture of a model of the Castillo de Gibralfaro and the connection to the Alcazaba.

Model of the Castle of Gil and the Alaczaba
Model of the Castillo de Gibralfaro and the Alcazaba

There were great pictures from the walls of the Castillo de Gibralfaro.

View of Malaga and port from Castiloo de Gibralfaro
View of Malaga and port from Castillo de Gibralfaro

DSC01581

The Castillo de Gibralfaro, including the lighthouse, was initial built around 929 AD, later expanded in the early part of the 14th century including a double wall down to the Alcazaba. The castle name comes from Arabic and Greek, meaning rock of the lighthouse (gebel-faro).

Walking the walls of Castillo de Gibralfaro
Walking the walls of Castillo de Gibralfaro
Castillo de Gibralfaro
Castillo de Gibralfaro
Castillo de Gibralfaro
Castillo de Gibralfaro
Castillo de Gibralfaro
Castillo de Gibralfaro

The trail down to the Alcazaba was above a lovely park.

View of the park below the trail to the Alcazaba
View of the park below the trail to the Alcazaba

The Alcazaba was built by the Hammudid dynasty in the early 11th century. It is the best-preserved Alcazaba (citadel) in Spain.

Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba
Alcazaba

A little friend looking for water on the grounds of the Alcazaba.

Skippy
Skippy
Rose garden at Alcazaba
Rose garden at Alcazaba

As I came out of Alcazaba the Teatro Romano was on my right.

Entrance to the Roman Theatre
Entrance to the Roman Theatre

This is the remnants of a Roman theater dating back to the 1st century BC. It is currently under restoration.

Roman Theatre dating back to 1st century BC
Roman Theatre dating back to 1st century BC
Roman Theatre
Roman Theatre

Walking through the town I ran across the Santa Iglesia Cathedral Basilica Santa Maria de la Encarnacion.

Basilica
Basilica

The Cathedral of Malaga, also known as Santa Iglesia Cathedral Basilica Santa Maria de la Encarnacion was built over a course of 254 years. The original plans included two towers but due to the lack of funds, only one tower was completed. This unfinished state has led to the Cathedral being called “La Manquita”, meaning in English, “The One-Armed Lady”.

Cathedral of Malaga
Cathedral of Malaga
Cathedral of Malaga
Cathedral of Malaga

I decided to swing up above the old town and go to the Museo Del Vidrio Y Cristal de Malaga. This was actually a group of gentlemen who purchased an old house and restored it 40 years ago, and started collecting glasswork. One thing lead to another, and they were following glasswork as far back as the Roman works, up to modern time.

Museo
Museo Del Vidrio Y Cristal de Malaga
Museo
Museo Del Vidrio Y Cristal de Malaga

The Paseo del Parque was another beautiful park stringing along the Alameda Principle Ave.

Park
Paseo del Parque
Park
Paseo del Parque
Park
Paseo del Parque

Exploring the city, I found the Museo Picasso Malaga. Just like the Picasso Museum in Barcelona, you couldn’t take any pictures. As previously noted, Pablo Ruiz Picasso was born in Malaga. This museum opened in 2003, and has 285 pieces donated by the Picasso family. While I do not have my own pictures, here are pictures from the internet on my favorites at the museum:

Picasso - The Acrobat
Picasso – The Female Acrobat
Picasso - Woman with Raised Hands
Picasso – Woman with Raised Arms
Susanna with the Elders
Susanna and the Elders
Picasso - Musketeer with a Sword
Picasso – Musketeer with a Sword

I enjoyed the Thyssen museum in Madrid so much, I thought I would check out their museum in Malaga. As it turned out, this was more about Spanish artist, so I didn’t really know any of them. One section of the museum didn’t allow photos, but here are a few pictures that I liked.

Picture-Juan Martinez Abades (1929) – Puerto Exterior y Abra de Bilboa and Punta Galea
Picture-Juan Martinez Abades (1929) – Puerto Exterior y Abra de Bilboa and Punta Galea
Picture-Guillermo Gomez Gil (1918) – Dusk Over the Coast of Malaga
Picture-Guillermo Gomez Gil (1918) – Dusk Over the Coast of Malaga
Picture-Dario de Regoyos y Valdes   (1905) – The Almond Tress in Blossom
Picture-Dario de Regoyos y Valdes (1905) – The Almond Tress in Blossom
Picture-Dario de Regoyos y Valdes   (1905) – The Almond Tress in Blossom
Picture-Antonio Munoz Degrain (1905-1910) – View of the Bay of Palma de Mallorca

After the art museums I stopped in at the Museo of Archeology. Here, they wouldn’t allow photos, which was a little unusual. I can tell you there were ruins of Phoenician walls from the 6th-7th B.C. There was a unique storage system uncovered, one where there was 6 very large vases buried in the ground with the tops sticking out of the floor, a process of using the ground for temperature control. This was the first time I had seen anything like this (saw this later in Pompeii). Very smart! This was from the 16th century. Last, but not least, there were remains from a 16th century fortress tower. Sorry, no pictures. I would have like to have provided some.

See you in Lisbon Portugal!

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